Certificate of Need and Mental Health

Most US states require hospitals and other healthcare providers to obtain a “Certificate of Need” (CON) from a state board before they are allowed to open or expand. These laws seem to be one reason why healthcare is often so expensive and hard to find. I’ve written a lot about them, partly because I think they are bad policies that could get repealed if more people knew about them, and partly because so many aspects of them are unstudied.

States vary widely in the specific services or equipment their CON laws target- nursing homes, dialysis clinics, MRIs, et c. One of the most important types of CON law that remained unstudied was CON for psychiatric services. I set out to change this and, with Eleanor Lewin, wrote an article on them just published in the Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics.

We compare the state of psychiatric care in states with and without CON, and find that psychiatric CON is associated with fewer psychiatric hospitals and beds, and a lower likelihood of those hospitals accepting Medicare.

Together with the existing evidence on CON (which I tried to sum up recently here), this suggests that more states should consider repealing their CON laws and letting doctors and patients, rather than state boards, decide what facilities are “economically necessary”.

One thought on “Certificate of Need and Mental Health

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s